Friday, March 16, 2012

Cobalt Boats: A Fisherman’s Dream

 

I’ve known Cobalt boats with an arm’s length sort of intimacy since 1991, the year I saw at first hand these remarkable watercrafts being built in a landlocked small town. In the two decades since, I’ve written thousands upon thousands of words about these boats, not one of which was, not one of which came close to . . . “fishing.”

I caught my first bullheads from a farm pond in 1952, my first big catfish on Blood Creek in Barton County, Kansas, and my first bass from a lake supplying the steam engines my family conducted for the Missouri Pacific Railroad.

At no time in those early outings, in fact at no time until the Nineties and my association with Cobalt Boats, did I hear the terms “wraparound lounge,” “swim platform,” “reversed chines,” or “bow filler cushion” in the context of having fun around water. As I came to know Cobalts better – the handmade perfection of their construction, the familial nature of the boatbuilders themselves – it became clear that here were boats intent for waterbound good times apart from worms and spinner baits and jigs-and-pigs. Listen to the language there, the genteel and the not so much.

These days I fish almost exclusively with a fly rod – my grandpa’s well and wildly weathered bamboo, the eight-weight gift from my best friend, the three-piece I carry always in my pickup, a fish or two forever imminent in these hills and their steams to which the cattle will soon return. And I am happy now to introduce the realized notion that a man might stand secure in the cockpit of a 220 drifting oh so nicely into a mossed-up rock bottom cove and might in a moment of pure, solitary joy cast a Montana, the yellow-and-black slow-sinking fly so thoroughly enjoyed by big bluegill and angry largemouth bass around here).

Cobalts have always been, will always be, the most social of boats, with yacht certification on the larger models that suggests come one-come all welcome to a St. Patrick’s Day party at sea. But bear this thought of early morning fog, the family still asleep ashore, when your Cobalt might be yours and yours alone.

You could do worse than be a long-rod floater, a quiet Cobalt cruiser among God’s submersed and splendid creatures.  Leather steering wheel, and all.

 

  Categories: Cobalt Boats, Lifestyle | Tags: Cobalt Boats, Cruiser, Cuddy , Luxury Boat, Saltwater


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