Friday, April 01, 2016

Best Boating Apps for 2016


The time is near – boating season in all its glory will soon be the topic of your weekends, vacations and reunions. If you’re new to the boating world, or just looking to freshen up your boating knowledge, here are the 10 best boating apps, rated by Discover Boating.

If you are looking to add some new boating apps to your tablet or smartphone, look no further. We’ve compiled a list of the 10 best boating apps to help you navigate, plan, share and socialize on the water this year:

1. Navionics Boating – GPS

Time and time again, when we speak to boaters and ask them what GPS app they’re using, Navionics Boating is the answer. Navionics is free to download and offers in-app purchases for charts and other upgrades, such as autorouting. Navionics Boating is available for both iOS and Android devices.

2. NOAA SuperRes Radar HD (iOS) or RadarScope (Android)

    In order to enjoy the day safely on the water, a close eye must be kept on the weather. If you’re on iOS, in our experience the best radar app is NOAA’s SuperRes Radar. It has very hi-resolution and incredible accuracy. If you are on an Android device, RadarScope is just as good and accesses the same data. These apps are not only good for boating, but just great to have any time you want to see what kind of weather is rolling in.

    3. Windfinder

    Ideal for sailors, kitesurfers, windsurfers and more, this app allows you to see the wind, waves and weather across the globe in real time. Windfinder is available for free (iOS andAndroid), or you can purchase the ad-free pro version (iOS and Android).

    4. USA Tides

    If you boat and/or fish in saltwater, having the latest marine tide information at your fingertips is invaluable. USA Tides is available for both iOS and Android and displays tide information for all stations in the US.

    5. Animated Knots

      Animated Knots by Grog is a broad teaching and reference tool for boaters and other hobbyists. With step-by-step instructions and, you guessed it, frame-by-frame animations, this app teaches you to tie knots at your own pace. For five dollars, you really can’t go wrong. You can download this app for iOS or Android.

      6. FishingScout

      A great resource and social app for anglers. The app allows you to upload photos of your latest catch, describe the conditions of how you caught it, study other locations where fish were caught, add friends, view their photos and more. Available for free on both iOS andAndroid.

      7. Dockwa

        The Dockwa app allows boaters to view marinas in their location, select a destination and request a slip or mooring, all from their mobile device. Once the marina approves the reservation, payment is processed seamlessly through the app. Dockwa hopes to be theOpentable of boating. Check out Dockwa on iOS or Android.

        8. Swell Advantage

        Swell Advantage is a social boating app that lets you see where your family and friends are out on the water, including where they are headed and their speed. Custom notifications inform you when family and friends get on the water. It’s free for iOS andAndroid (beta).

        9. Boatrax

          Boatrax lets you keep detailed records of your boat while capturing and sharing your moments with family and friends. You can share your location and photos with friends and the boating community. You can pick up Boatrax for both iOS and Android.

          10. Camera app

            Last but certainly not least, make sure you use your camera app to document all your boating adventures this year and share it with us on Facebook and Instagram!


              Categories: Boating Safety, Cobalt Boats, Industry News, Innovative Features, Lifestyle, Shows and Events, Tips and Hints, Videos | Tags: Award Winning Boat, Boating Industry, Cobalt Boats, Lifestyle

            Saturday, July 14, 2012

            A Cobalt Boater’s Dictionary


            Your ownership of a Cobalt boat entitles you to use loud and often nautical terms of every stripe: those that have come fully into the vernacular — “learn the ropes,” for example – and those that remain damp and obscure — the onomatopoetic “garbling,” for example,  “the illegal practice of mixing cargo with garbage.” No garbling around here.  None whatsoever, as we invite you to talk the talk just as confidently as your Cobalt  . . . er  . . . walks the walk.  Do be careful then, as nautical terms do sometimes make for unworkable metaphors.

            • Anchor’s aweigh: Your cry to all aboard once the anchor has just cleared the bottom, signaling that you’re underway on a morning of absolute fun.
            • Amidships: midway between the bow and stern of your Cobalt
            • Astern: at the rear of your boat
            • Ballast: a sophisticated set of tanks and their controls used to control buoyancy and stability on the Cobalt WSS boats
            • Beam: the width of your Cobalt at its widest point
            • Belay: to secure a rope by winding on a pin or cleat
            • Bilge: the lower part of the inner hull, the deep-V hull that contributes so mightily to your Cobalt’s smooth, oh so smooth ride
            • Binnacle: the case in which a compass is kept
            • Brightwork: exposed polished metal on your Cobalt, pretty much everywhere on your Cobalt
            • Buoy: a floating object of defined shape and color, anchored at a given position to serve as an aid to navigation, a floating object frequently struck by other boaters staring at your beautiful new Cobalt 243
            • Chine: an angle on the hull, reversed on Cobalt hulls to enhance stability and  strength
            • Escutcheon: that area on the stern where you have lovingly displayed your Cobalt’s given name
            • Freeboard: distance between the waterline and the gunwale on your Cobalt, a safe, eminently workable distance
            • Gunwale: upper edge of your Cobalt’s side
            • Handsomely: in a slow, even motion as in the retrieval of a line, as in “My, my, my. That Cobalt surely does leave the dock handsomely.”
            • Keelhauling: maritime punishment in which the condemned sailor is dragged under the keel of a wooden ship, the barnacles doing their worst on the poor man; in fact, keelhauling simply will no longer work as a punishment for or deterrent to on-the-water misbehavior, such is the smooth perfection of the Cobalt hull
            • Knot: a unit of speed – one nautical mile (1.1508 landlocked mile) per hour
            • Land lubber: a person unfamiliar with being on the sea; also; a person unlucky enough to have never boarded a Cobalt
            • Lanyard: a rope or line for fastening aboard your boat
            • Larboard: the left side of a Cobalt, less common of course than portside, the counterpart of starboard, the right side of the boat
            • Marina: a docking facility for boats and yachts, the scene of obvious and uncontrollable envy on the part of otherwise quite decent, quite lovable owners of boats manufactured somewhere other than Neodesha, Kansas
            • Planing: when a fast-moving Cobalt skims over the water instead of pushing through it; the adverb/adjective pair most frequently attached to a Cobalt’s planning – “essentially instant”
            • Scuttlebutt: a barrel with a hole from which sailors would drink; hence, a shipboard drinking fountain and therefore, in modern naval slang, “gossip”; a term now used almost exclusively at boat shows in the context of the Cobalt innovations about to be introduced for the new model year
            • Skipper: the captain of the boat, as in “Skipper, are you truly this talented, or are you relying on the Livorsi engine controls, standard on all Cobalt twin-engine powertrains to dock your 303?”
            • Transom: the transverse members of the boat’s construction at the stern, an aft wall of sorts to which the drive portion of the sterndrive is attached
            • Windlass: a winch used to raise your boat’s anchor

            Anchor’s aweigh fer sure, me hearties!  And the scuttlebutt is that the skipper is just about to stand abeam and order an extra ration of grog for the entire ship’s company.


              Categories: Lifestyle, Tips and Hints | Tags: Boating Industry, Cobalt Boats, Lifestyle, Luxury Boat, Saltwater

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