Friday, August 17, 2012

A Cobalt Boat Trip to Table Rock

 

My family has just returned from an extended Fourth-of-July stay at Table Rock Lake. A group of people from back home (Wichita, Kansas) built cabins in a rugged, wooded strip of shoreline west of Shell Knob, Missouri, the Cobalts waiting at a dock called “The Have-Nots Hangout.”

Deep-down, bedrock happiness, drawn from the rock formation that serves as a scenic overlook off Highway 165, large and flat this rock, above what was to be original site for Table Rock’s dam and the heaven-sent water that backed up behind the dam’s 1.2 million cubic yards of concrete. Water that, per the younger Cobalt riders in our group, “lets you see your feet.” So clear and, in this year of such very strange weather, so warm, Table Rock’s waters are so deeply green, so often calm that the mountains reflected there mirror in a shimmer the Ozarks’ grandeur.

Even during the Independence Day frenzy, the chop was manageable in a lesser boat, simply not a factor in a Cobalt boat – Table Rock is that big, that fingered. And when a mid-afternoon thunderstorm rolled quickly through and the lake cleared of boats, the lake settled immediately into dimpled glass.  Boaters love Table Rock first, last, and always for that miraculous water.

And for what it makes possible: the cliff jumping with family and friends at anchor to shoot video of the daredevils, many of them barely in junior-high school; the wakeboarding at preternatural, but survivable speed; and the quiet, smooth corner where a little kid first comes up on skis.  That warm, clear Table Rock water gives rise even to retail traditions – taking the Cobalt for ice cream at Big M marina, to Shell Knob for pizza, to Kimberling City for live music.

With its winding origins in the White River, Table Rock can be a fine and private place for hundreds of people, all at once, here and there, with little coves and inlets the defining features of the lake.  At the same time, massive anchorings of party-minded boaters are also a Table Rock deal from the get-go.

And did I mention that you can see your feet?


Thanks to John Brown for contributing

 

  Categories: Lifestyle | Tags: Boat Dealers, Destination, Luxury Boat, New Boat


Saturday, July 14, 2012

A Cobalt Boater’s Dictionary

 

Your ownership of a Cobalt boat entitles you to use loud and often nautical terms of every stripe: those that have come fully into the vernacular — “learn the ropes,” for example – and those that remain damp and obscure — the onomatopoetic “garbling,” for example,  “the illegal practice of mixing cargo with garbage.” No garbling around here.  None whatsoever, as we invite you to talk the talk just as confidently as your Cobalt  . . . er  . . . walks the walk.  Do be careful then, as nautical terms do sometimes make for unworkable metaphors.

  • Anchor’s aweigh: Your cry to all aboard once the anchor has just cleared the bottom, signaling that you’re underway on a morning of absolute fun.
  • Amidships: midway between the bow and stern of your Cobalt
  • Astern: at the rear of your boat
  • Ballast: a sophisticated set of tanks and their controls used to control buoyancy and stability on the Cobalt WSS boats
  • Beam: the width of your Cobalt at its widest point
  • Belay: to secure a rope by winding on a pin or cleat
  • Bilge: the lower part of the inner hull, the deep-V hull that contributes so mightily to your Cobalt’s smooth, oh so smooth ride
  • Binnacle: the case in which a compass is kept
  • Brightwork: exposed polished metal on your Cobalt, pretty much everywhere on your Cobalt
  • Buoy: a floating object of defined shape and color, anchored at a given position to serve as an aid to navigation, a floating object frequently struck by other boaters staring at your beautiful new Cobalt 243
  • Chine: an angle on the hull, reversed on Cobalt hulls to enhance stability and  strength
  • Escutcheon: that area on the stern where you have lovingly displayed your Cobalt’s given name
  • Freeboard: distance between the waterline and the gunwale on your Cobalt, a safe, eminently workable distance
  • Gunwale: upper edge of your Cobalt’s side
  • Handsomely: in a slow, even motion as in the retrieval of a line, as in “My, my, my. That Cobalt surely does leave the dock handsomely.”
  • Keelhauling: maritime punishment in which the condemned sailor is dragged under the keel of a wooden ship, the barnacles doing their worst on the poor man; in fact, keelhauling simply will no longer work as a punishment for or deterrent to on-the-water misbehavior, such is the smooth perfection of the Cobalt hull
  • Knot: a unit of speed – one nautical mile (1.1508 landlocked mile) per hour
  • Land lubber: a person unfamiliar with being on the sea; also; a person unlucky enough to have never boarded a Cobalt
  • Lanyard: a rope or line for fastening aboard your boat
  • Larboard: the left side of a Cobalt, less common of course than portside, the counterpart of starboard, the right side of the boat
  • Marina: a docking facility for boats and yachts, the scene of obvious and uncontrollable envy on the part of otherwise quite decent, quite lovable owners of boats manufactured somewhere other than Neodesha, Kansas
  • Planing: when a fast-moving Cobalt skims over the water instead of pushing through it; the adverb/adjective pair most frequently attached to a Cobalt’s planning – “essentially instant”
  • Scuttlebutt: a barrel with a hole from which sailors would drink; hence, a shipboard drinking fountain and therefore, in modern naval slang, “gossip”; a term now used almost exclusively at boat shows in the context of the Cobalt innovations about to be introduced for the new model year
  • Skipper: the captain of the boat, as in “Skipper, are you truly this talented, or are you relying on the Livorsi engine controls, standard on all Cobalt twin-engine powertrains to dock your 303?”
  • Transom: the transverse members of the boat’s construction at the stern, an aft wall of sorts to which the drive portion of the sterndrive is attached
  • Windlass: a winch used to raise your boat’s anchor

Anchor’s aweigh fer sure, me hearties!  And the scuttlebutt is that the skipper is just about to stand abeam and order an extra ration of grog for the entire ship’s company.

 

  Categories: Lifestyle, Tips and Hints | Tags: Boating Industry, Cobalt Boats, Lifestyle, Luxury Boat, Saltwater


Tuesday, July 03, 2012

A Visit To Lake Norman

 

Lake Norman stretches for more than 30 miles, with a surface area of 32,500 acres and a shoreline of more than 520 miles, earning thereby its nickname of the “Inland Sea.”  Located just north of Charlotte, North Carolina, Lake Norman has become a favorite of boaters throughout the southeastern United States, both for weekend excursions and for extended vacations in which enjoyment of a new Cobalt comes amid other splendid leisure opportunities, both urban and rural. The mountains and the coast wait just a short drive away, in opposite directions of course.

Photo Courtesy of Lake Communities

Cornelius, Davidson, and Huntersville are the nearest North Carolina Communities, each with big-name hotels and bed-and-breakfast inns, most of the former located just off I-77, 20 minutes from Charlotte.  Please be advised, however, that lake-front rentals remain scarce and difficult to obtain. The temperatures on Lake Norman – this unprecedented early season heat notwithstanding — will float in the upper 80s this summer. Oddly, July is the wettest month in the region.
But enough of these dry facts. Enough, we say!

Let’s turn quickly to what might be. As you cruise the main channel of Lake Norman and you notice another Cobalt keeping pace several boat-lengths over, you might want to look a bit closer at the captain across the way. Because Charlotte is ground-zero of the cultural phenomenon that is NASCAR, there is a concrete possibility that a car-driver very comfortable at 200 miles per hour will be more than comfortable driving a Cobalt at 55. You do not want to race on Lake Norman!  Despite the lake’s lack of a speed limit, a North Carolina Class B misdemeanor waits for recklessness of any sort. And besides who back home will believe that you shut down Joe Gibbs Racing?  A strict no-wake policy applies around all man-made structures.

It’s also quite possible that you will see perched atop a buoy a bird you believe to be an eagle.  It’s not. It’s an osprey.
It’s somewhat possible that you will see a marine creature of huge bulk with significant dentition. And scales. Green scales, reportedly. With, as we say, many, many teeth.  That would be Normie.  Normie, the Lake Norman Monster.  With, of course, a website: www.lakenormanmoster.com. And coloring books for children, the more contrarian of whom may color Normie’s scales purple.

And, by all means, drop in to say hello to Mark Kale, general manager, at Lake Norman Marina, your Cobalt dealer, at 6965 Highway 150 East, just over nine miles west of I-77, three miles east of Highway 16. (704-483-5546).

Normie can wait.

 

  Categories: Cobalt Boats, Dealer Partners, Lifestyle | Tags: Cobalt Boats, Destination, Family Boating, Lifestyle


Friday, May 18, 2012

A Cobalt Boat Is Not Just A Boat

 

A boat is not a boat is not a boat and, at Cobalt, will never be just a boat.

Which is to say, we design our boats every model year to meet the evolving needs of ever more sophisticated owners, luxury boats that incorporate the latest technology and the very best of our most recent thinking, boats adapted to specific recreational opportunities. Which is not to say that we don’t build boats which adapt very well indeed to multiple recreational opportunities.

None more than the 26SD, a veritable Swiss Army knife among boats. With the 26SD we designed to a single over-riding principle, one unchanging truth.  Fun follows function.

We know that the good times roll when a family boat has been built to answer your every demand for performance, for adaptability, for genuine innovation in the service of a happy, carefree day on the water. The 26SD is every bit as much about skiing and waterboarding as about quiet conversation on a leisurely cruise. The ride on the 26SD is dry and smooth – even on coastal chop. The coming on plane is sudden, the seating expanded, the choice of powertrains complete and specific.

The 26SD of course continues the recent Cobalt innovations of the water-level swim platform and its patented swim-step, flipped down for safe, quick, easy movement in and out of the water. A beach boarding ladder serves a similar function.

We’ve intentionally created a list of optional equipment essentially twice the number of standard features. Intentionally, so that buyers are free to come to Cobalt at an affordable base price, and then to decide for themselves what options will best serve the 26SD’s intended fun. From the look of the boat itself – with three-color hull graphics, for example – to the choice of carpet fibers, from the reach and heft of the sound system to cool functionality of a refrigerator to the addition of a stainless-steel arch with a bimini top, the 26SD waits to serve – functionally now, functionally — the fun of the moment.

Which is to say, the 26SD is a boat that can and will be the boat.

For you, the boat.

 

  Categories: Cobalt Boats, Innovative Features, Lifestyle | Tags: Award Winning Boat, Bowrider, Cobalt Boats, Family Boating, Luxury Boat, New Boat


Thursday, May 03, 2012

Dare to Dream of A Cobalt

 

It never, ever hurts to dream.  To dream huge, fine, and faraway.  And so today’s cruise to fantasyland involves land belonging to three different countries – Germany, Austria, and Switzerland – about 250 miles of shoreline surrounding Lake Constance. The Swiss Alps jut above, stunning in their vistadom, the ideal backdrop for life to be lived for a time on a Cobalt of European extraction, one of the cuddies in the line probably, a 273 let’s say, the 273 an amalgam of luxury, utility, convenience, comfort, and performance that speaks to the needs of essentially every owner, its broad beam welcoming to you, your traveling companions, and the sunset about to explode in this old, old part of Western civilization, where reconstructed dwellings from the Stone and Bronze Ages wait ashore.

As do other beacons of culture when you leave your Cobalt for a day trip to the vineyards, quite odd museums, historic town squares, ornate churches, and – yes, Virginia — castles surrounding Lake Constance. Maybe you’ll slip into Friedrichshafen, Germany, the city which gave the world the zeppelin, the cigar-shaped hot-air balloon invented there by old Count Ferdinand von Z. himself. Or maybe you’ll listen to /Tosca/ performed on the Constance-borne floating stage at the town of Bergenz in Austria. A lake festival in Arbon, Switzerland in June culminates in a massive fireworks display like unto that a few days later on the Grand Lake of the Cherokees. The German town of Konstanz gave the lake its name and its principal picnic item, Muenster so outrageously good that an accompanying wine is routinely forgotten.

Angling is prolific, and the lake serves up several species of incredibly edible fish, varieties of perch, pike, and trout at the top of the list – staples of the restaurants in every shore-town.  Perfect beaches, both sand and pebble, punctuate the lake, made picturesque not just by the sleek Mediterranean lines of your luxury Cobalt boat, but also by the frequent regattas and sailing competitions throughout the summer months.

As the third largest lake in Europe, and the biggest lake in the region of the Black Forest, Constance is popular, and then some.  By no means overcrowded, the area is nonetheless aflutter with leisure activity of every sort, and you’ll share Lake Constance with laughing, friendly people – locals and tourists alike – all attuned to a healthful outdoor lifestyle.

Please be advised that a license, easily enough obtained, is required to captain a Cobalt on the lake. For additional information about a dreamy vacation centered around a pre-alpine lake of pristine beauty with German airships overhead, you simply cannot find more informed, more helpful people than the happy folks at our Cobalt dealerships: Brunnert-Grimm AG Espen 9, CH-8274 Gottlieben Tel 0041 71 669 11 77 Fax 0041 71 669 15 56

info@brunnert-grimm.ch  www.brunnter-grimm.ch  or Boote Pfister GmbH Wahlweg 6, D-97525 Schwebheim, Tel.: +49 (0)9723 9371-0, Fax: +49 (0)9723 9371-21 jpfister@bootepfister.de   www.bootepfister.de

 

  Categories: Dealer Partners, Lifestyle | Tags: Boat Dealers, Destination, Lifestyle


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