Thursday, March 22, 2012

Your Best Weekends

 

In no way reasonable do I pretend that the looming, if warm and well-lit, interior of an exhibition hall can reproduce the joys of your favorite cove. But you can visit the arena nearest you in these latter, all-important days of America’s boat-show season, and you can check out the new Cobalts on display there.  Yes you can.

In every way reasonable I argue that those few precious hours in the company of these boats will remind you that a new Cobalt can become a place set apart in space and time, even under the domed concrete ceiling of a trade show.  Even there, with the popcorn smell and the undertones of a thousand conversations, a new Cobalt will incline you toward a state of mind that says, “Let’s slow down here. Let’s sit and enjoy each other’s company a while longer.”  Yes, you should.

And then you can come to the point of this particular afternoon, and you can take a hard, work-manly look at the Cobalt models for 2012, four of them brand new to the line. You might then dig around in the Cobalt of your choice.  You might look at the stitching of the upholstery. You might run your hand along the gleaming finish of a perfect gelcoat.  You might open some storage bins, and notice their the fit and finish of a boat that’s way, way more than meets the casual eye. You might decide that right here is a boat ready to take you down to the sea in style, safety, dependability, and obvious comfort.  Yes, you might.

So here’s the deal. Make the sea level rise.  Roll up your pants, and visit a boat show near you. You deserve an up-close and very personal look-see with some new friends from a Cobalt dealership near you.

Yes, you do.

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  Categories: Shows and Events | Tags: Destination, Family Boating, Lifestyle, Luxury Boat, New Boat


Friday, March 16, 2012

Cobalt Boats: A Fisherman’s Dream

 

I’ve known Cobalt boats with an arm’s length sort of intimacy since 1991, the year I saw at first hand these remarkable watercrafts being built in a landlocked small town. In the two decades since, I’ve written thousands upon thousands of words about these boats, not one of which was, not one of which came close to . . . “fishing.”

I caught my first bullheads from a farm pond in 1952, my first big catfish on Blood Creek in Barton County, Kansas, and my first bass from a lake supplying the steam engines my family conducted for the Missouri Pacific Railroad.

At no time in those early outings, in fact at no time until the Nineties and my association with Cobalt Boats, did I hear the terms “wraparound lounge,” “swim platform,” “reversed chines,” or “bow filler cushion” in the context of having fun around water. As I came to know Cobalts better – the handmade perfection of their construction, the familial nature of the boatbuilders themselves – it became clear that here were boats intent for waterbound good times apart from worms and spinner baits and jigs-and-pigs. Listen to the language there, the genteel and the not so much.

These days I fish almost exclusively with a fly rod – my grandpa’s well and wildly weathered bamboo, the eight-weight gift from my best friend, the three-piece I carry always in my pickup, a fish or two forever imminent in these hills and their steams to which the cattle will soon return. And I am happy now to introduce the realized notion that a man might stand secure in the cockpit of a 220 drifting oh so nicely into a mossed-up rock bottom cove and might in a moment of pure, solitary joy cast a Montana, the yellow-and-black slow-sinking fly so thoroughly enjoyed by big bluegill and angry largemouth bass around here).

Cobalts have always been, will always be, the most social of boats, with yacht certification on the larger models that suggests come one-come all welcome to a St. Patrick’s Day party at sea. But bear this thought of early morning fog, the family still asleep ashore, when your Cobalt might be yours and yours alone.

You could do worse than be a long-rod floater, a quiet Cobalt cruiser among God’s submersed and splendid creatures.  Leather steering wheel, and all.

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  Categories: Cobalt Boats, Lifestyle | Tags: Cobalt Boats, Cruiser, Cuddy , Luxury Boat, Saltwater


Friday, February 24, 2012

The Cobalt Ride

 

As the years go by, we hear time and many times again that the most memorable, and therefore the most critical, component of the Cobalt Experience is The Ride. You sit in the bow of a 220. You captain a 232. You relax rather completely on the lounge of a 276. And you notice almost nothing.  No discomfiting thump as your Cobalt comes on plane. No unpleasant bouncing about at cruise.No slip and slide in the turns.

And no component of the Cobalt Ride matters more, contributes more, than the extended running surface, an abstract sort of deal if ever there were one.  The marine engineering says that a boat’s ride smooths and stabilizes as more of the hull maintains contact with the water at speed. Existential, the effects of this contact.

The hull’s surface forces against the water – Cobalt fiberglass touching gulf and lake and river at cruising speed.  And the results are unmistakable: quicker planning, firmer and truer turns, minimized bow rise, more lift astern and, when combined with the deep-V shape of the prototypical Cobalt hull, comfort and security so nearly perfect that . . . well . . . let’s tear across the bay again.

Just to feel The Ride once more.

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  Categories: Cobalt Boats, Innovative Features, Lifestyle, Watersports | Tags: Boat Builders, Boat Dealers, Cobalt Boats, Luxury Boat


Monday, February 20, 2012

Setting the Industry Standard

 

Imitation, the old saying goes, is the purest form of flattery.  For a boat manufacturer – no, for a bunch of boat manufacturers – to copy Cobalt ideas can be downright up-puffing.  And so, you’ll please forgive the folks in Neodesha for a quick mention of the ways in which they’ve been imitated, the Cobalt innovations that have gone on to become industry standards.

All perfectly legal, you understand, this borrowing of what once were fundamental differentiations in the design and building of these boats.  Legal after a sufficient period of exclusivity, and therefore and thereafter  flattering.  Over the years, would-be competitors have seen the wisdom of metal backing plates installed in the fiberglass below hardware on the deck, multiplying the strength, increasing the longevity of hard-working cleats and eyes and rails. Cobalt has added muscle and bone to the most vulnerable areas in a boat’s design – at the bow, for instance, where the now-legendary Cobalt scuff plate stands guard.  And everywhere, deep down in the fiberglass behind every bolt, every screw on every hardware attachment, there rides plated reinforcement, ruggedness belied by the friendly reflections of a perfect gelcoat.

And next time you pass by a Cobalt windshield, pause for a moment to understand the stresses inevitably applied there.  Feel the cold rigidity of the stainless steel designed everywhere in the windshield, its mounting, and its supports.  Know that Cobalt has anticipated the worst, has designed the best possible resistance to wind, to the force of years of happy use of your boat.  Next week, we’ll talk about the often, if unsuccessfully, copied Cobalt ride, an extended story in itself.  Stay strong, you who go down to the sea.

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  Categories: Cobalt Boats, Industry News, Innovative Features, Lifestyle | Tags: Boat Builders, Boat Dealers, Family Boating, Lifestyle, Luxury Boat


Monday, February 13, 2012

Cobalt Innovation

 

United States Patents do not belong to those terrified by paperwork.  The application process calls for a black-and-white welter of forms, abstracts, descriptions, claims, amendments and, in some cases, appeals. We’re protecting intellectual property here, folks, and there are lawyers involved.  A peculiar set of attorneys, odd in their wanting to wade knee-deep into the minutiae of what belongs to whom for how long and why.

So it comes with some pomp, some legal precedence, this Cobalt swim step and its patent. As is with so many great ideas – gravity, yeast, the hula-hoop – the Cobalt swim step operates as a beautiful simplicity, its form matched honestly to its function. Kiddos with inflatable wings pushing their pudgy little deltoids right up into the sunlight can scamper in and out of the water with natural-born ease and public safety, thanks to this step, this lift and soft drop, this elegant contraption of electropolished stainless steel deploying – and then retracting to its hiding place –in the splash of a cannonballer’s fun. We’re talking seconds here, folks.

As with so many other Cobalt innovations, other Cobalt creations of an industry’s standard, there will come imitators. From the bow scuff-plate to the backing on siderails to the flip-lip captain’s seat, Cobalt design has been copied and copied again by would-be competitors. And they will most certainly now be investigating the nuts-and-bolts of the swim step, eager to adapt it for their own borrowed use.  But not for seven years or so.  Not if this federal government of ours has anything to say about this particular little deal.

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  Categories: Industry News, Innovative Features, Videos, Watersports | Tags: Award Winning Boat, Boat Builders, Boating Industry, Cobalt Boats, Lifestyle, Watersports


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